Thursday, July 10, 2014

Compliance and Security Seals from a Different Perspective


Compliance attestations. Quality seals like “Hacker Safe!” All of these things bother most security people I know because to us, these provide very little insight into the security of anything in a tangible way. Or do they? I saw this reply to my blog post on compliance vs. security which made an interesting point. A point, I dare say, I had not really put front-of-mind but probably should have.

Ron Parker was of course correct…and he touched on a much bigger point that this comment was a part of. Much of the time compliance and ‘security badges, aka “security seals” on websites, aren’t done for the sake of making the website or product actually more secure … they’re done to assure the customer that the site or entity is worthy of their trust and business. This is contrary to conventional thinking in the security community.

Think about that for a second.

With that frame of reference, all the push to compliance and all the silly little “Hacker Safe!” security seals on websites make sense. Maybe they’re not secure, or maybe they are, but the point isn’t to demonstrate some level of absolute security. The point is to reassure you, the user, that you are doing business with someone who thought about your interests. Well…at least they pretended to. Whether it’s privacy, security, or both… the proprietors of this website or that store want to give you some way to feel safe doing business with them.

All this starts to bend the brain a bit, around the idea of why we really do security things. We need to earn someone’s business, through his or her trust. The risks we take on the road to earn their business …well that’s up to us to worry about. Who do you suppose is more qualified to make the assessment of ‘appropriate risk level’ – you or your customers? With some notable exception the answer won’t be your customers.

Realistically you don’t want your customers trying to decide for themselves what is or isn’t appropriate levels of security. Frankly, I wouldn’t be comfortable with this either. The reality behind this thinking is that the customer simply doesn’t know any better, typically, and would likely make the wrong decision given the chance. So it’s up to you to decide, and that’s fair. Of course, this makes the assumption that you as the proprietor have the customer’s interests in mind, and have some clue on how to do risk assessments and balance risk/reward. Lots to assume, I know. Also, you know what happens when you ass-u-me, right?

So let’s wind back to my point now. Compliance and security seals are a good thing. Before you pick up that rock to throw at me, think about this again. The problem isn’t that compliance and “security seals” exist but that I think we’re mis-understanding their utility. The answer isn’t to throw these tools away and create something else, because that something else will likely be just as complicated (or useless) and needlessly waste resources on solving a problem that already is somewhat on its way. Instead, let’s look to make compliance and security seals more useful to the end customer so you can focus on making that risk equation balance in your favor. I don’t quite know what that solution would look like, yet, but I’m going to investigate it with some smart people. I think ultimately there needs to be some way to convey the level security ‘effort’ by the proprietor, which becomes binding and the owner can be held liable for providing false information, or stretching the truth.

With this perspective I think we could take these various compliance regulations and align them with expectations that customers have, while tying them to some security and risk goals. This makes more sense than what I see being adopted today. The goal isn’t to be compliant, well, I mean, it is … but it’s not to be compliant and call that security. It’s to be compliant as a result of being more secure. Remembering that the compliance thing and security seal is for your customers is liberating and lets you focus on the bigger picture of balancing risk/reward for your business.


What do you think? Am I totally off my rocker?

1 comment:

ScreamingByte said...

I was going to write a comment, but it was so lengthy it turned into its own blog...

http://screamingbyte.ishackingyou.com/2014/07/social-engineering-clients.html

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